Last updated: September 06. 2013 2:20PM - 204 Views

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Have you ever heard of passive programming? It is a fun and interesting way to present programming ideas without actively presenting them to a group. At the Delaware County District Library, you will see passive programming boards popping up at branch locations.

This month at the Delaware Main Library to celebrate the start of the Summer Olympics, visitors are encouraged to guess the names of 20 former Olympians whose photos are posted on a bulletin board. Adult services manager Joe O’Rourke created the intriguing passive program display that will stay in place for about a month, giving you plenty of time to submit your guesses.

When you submit your guesses, you can use your real name or a nickname (think online trivia games in restaurants). Each week, names of the top entries will be posted near the bulletin board. While there are no trips to Hawaii or any other prize for the winning entries, you can have the satisfaction and prestige of seeing your name on the leader board.

The passive programming challenges will be changing throughout the year to help keep your mind sharp and maybe even learn something new. I tried my hand at this month’s challenge and even though I am the least sports-minded person I know, I scored 14 out of 20. Not bad.

Who is Norma Talmadge?

Norma Talmadge (May 2, 1894-Dec. 24, 1957) was an American actress and film producer of the silent era. According to The New Biographical Dictionary of Film, she met and married producer and businessman Joseph M. Schenck in 1916, and with his backing they formed their own production company and turned out a number of films, the first of which was “Panthea” (1917). Her company produced hits such as “The Wonderful Thing” (1921), and “The Song of Love” (1923). About this time, “talkies” were all the rage, and Norma’s voice did not lend itself to sound, forcing her out of the movie business. She divorced Schenck and married George Jessel who had his own radio show, thinking she would revive her stalled film career, but the show was ultimately canceled. She divorced Jessel in 1939 and married Dr. Carvel James in 1946. She remained with him until she died of a stroke on Christmas Eve in 1957 in Las Vegas, Nevada. She was 62 and had been in a phenomenal more than 250 motion pictures.

Is there a shark known as a “cookie cutter?”

The cookie cutter shark, also called the cigar shark, is a species of small dogfish shark, living in warm, oceanic waters worldwide, particularly near islands. Reaching only 17 to 22 inches in length, the cookie cutter shark has a long, cylindrical body with a short, blunt snout, large eyes, two tiny spineless dorsal fins and a large caudal fin. It is dark brown in color with a darker “collar” around its throat and gill slits. The name “cookie cutter shark” refers to its feeding habit of gouging round plugs, like a cookie cutter, out of larger animals, according to the book simply titled, Sharks.

Where is Macquarie Island?

The tiny island of Macquarie, part of the Australian state of Tasmania, lies in a spot where tectonic plates meet, about halfway between New Zealand and Antarctica. Macquarie is a breeding ground for aquatic life, particularly elephant seals and royal penguins. It is also home to other seals and penguins, several species of albatross and other sea birds, plus a few dozen wildlife scientists and park rangers who work there on a temporary basis. For more information, check in The Complete Atlas of the World.

If you have a question that you would like to see answered in this column, mail it to Mary Jane Santos, Delaware County District Library, 84 E. Winter St., Delaware, OH 43015, or call us at 740-362-3861. You can also email your questions by visiting the library’s website at delawarelibrary.org or directly to Mary Jane at mjsantos@delawarelibrary.org. No matter how you contact us, we’re always glad you asked.

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