Last updated: March 05. 2014 2:02PM - 512 Views

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Delaware County has a Community Enhancement Program it uses to issue grants to worthwhile organizations.


This week, with $92,500 remaining of the $650,000 originally budgeted for 2014, representatives of six of the county’s most important non-profit organizations addressed the county commissioners regarding the groups’ grant applications.


The six are the Delaware County Fair, the Delaware County Historical Society, the Arts Castle, Central Ohio Symphony, the Delaware Speech and Hearing Center, and Main Street Delaware.


Also making an application was a seventh non-profit, the Hartford Fair. While it’s located just across the county line, at Croton in Licking County, it also has a revered history among Delaware Countians.


These organizations are so well-known, longstanding and vital that it is easy to take them for granted.


Yet their grant applications show they could be contributing even more, or they could be on even better footing, with some financial help.


The Delaware County Fair wants to spend $75,000 to renovate its Junior Fair Building, so it can host events and generate revenue year-round.


The Delaware County Historical Society wants $20,000 to expand its outreach program to students around the county.


The Arts Castle seeks $15,000 to help cover the expenses associated with its historic building, which is one of the brightest gems in Delaware City.


The Central Ohio Symphony seeks $8,000 to launch an educational program for about 1,600 fourth-graders in the Buckeye Valley and Big Walnut school districts.


The Delaware Speech and Hearing Center seeks $15,862 to complete repairs to a leaking roof at its West Central Avenue location.


Main Street Delaware is asking for $15,000 to continue its slate of events and possibly add another in the fall.


The Hartford Fair seeks $5,000 annually for the next four years, to conduct a water line survey to see if the fairgrounds can be served by DelCo Water, which would replace five wells now in use.


It is not our object here to suggest what the county commissioners ultimately should decide regarding the grant requests. The annual $650,000 allotment is a hefty amount and it’s unlikely very many counties have anything similar to the Community Enhancement Program.


The lesson to the public is these non-profits deserve our support in every way, particularly regarding any future fundraising events they might launch.

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