The Latest: Ex-soldier kills 5 officers in Dallas


DALLAS (AP) — The Latest on the shooting of police officers in Dallas (all times local):

1:50 a.m.

A black Army veteran upset about fatal police shootings of black men and bent on exterminating white police officers killed five lawmen in a sniper attack that layered new anxiety onto a nation already divided about guns and how police treat African-Americans.

Micah Johnson, who donned a protective vest and used a military-style semi-automatic rifle, was killed by a robot-delivered bomb after the Thursday evening shootings, authorities said. It marked the deadliest day for U.S. law enforcement since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

In all, 12 officers were shot just a few blocks from where President John F. Kennedy was slain in 1963.

___

11 p.m.

Philando Castile’s mother and two of his uncles are condemning a shooting in Dallas that left five police officers dead and wounded several more.

In an interview with CNN, Valerie Castile says her son would not have approved of the shootings “because he believed that all lives matter.”

Police say Dallas suspect Micah Johnson was upset about the fatal police shootings of Castile in Minnesota and Alton Sterling in Louisiana.

Tracy Castile says while the video of his nephew’s death is horrific, he is glad it came out. He says he and his family are looking for due process. He wants the officer involved to be “treated like any other criminal.”

State investigators identified the two officers as Jeronimo Yanez and Joseph Kauser. Both are on administrative leave.

___

10:30 p.m.

A military lawyer says the man who fatally shot five officers in Dallas was accused of sexual harassment by a female solider when he served in the Army in Afghanistan in May 2014.

Lawyer Bradford Glendening says Micah Johnson was sent back to the U.S. with the recommendation he be removed from the Army with an “other than honorable” discharge.

Glendening, who represented Johnson at the time, said Friday that the recommendation was “highly unusual” since generally counseling is ordered before more drastic steps are taken.

Glendening said Johnson was set to be removed from the Army in September 2014 because of the incident. Instead, Johnson got an honorable discharge the following April — for reasons Gardening doesn’t understand.

comments powered by Disqus